Posted on

TwitterCooler v0.2 – Make Twitter More Like Office Chatter

(formerly TweetSpeak, changed as to eliminate confusion with TweetSpeak.com)

While I’m fond of the Twitter-as-water-cooler metaphor, there was something missing.

Namely Twitter is quiet, and offices are filled with loud, distracting chatter.

If you’re on a Mac you can now remedy this issue with TwitterCooler.app.

TwitterCooler downloads your friends tweets and reads them to you using the Mac’s built-in voices (selected at random).

Hey it’s Friday, you weren’t planning to get anything done anyway. :)

Posted on

AppleScript: Send iTunes Playlist to MarsEdit

In preparation for declaring my picks from the 2007 SXSW Showcasing Artist tracks, I’ve put together an Applescript that pulls the track names, artists, ratings, and comments from an iTunes playlist and sends them to MarsEdit for blog posting.

The script even makes a half-hearted attempt to guess the artist’s website and direct mp3 link.

SendSXSWTracksToMarsEdit.scpt

Posted on

QSPress – Quicksilver and WordPress Make Me Twitter

I’m with Aaron, I don’t quite get Twitter. If you want to know what’s on my mind…read this blog. What I do get about is really, really fast publishing. The faster, the better.

So, I cooked up a little script (11 lines) to post directly to this blog from Quicksilver. If you’ve got a WordPress blog, or blog that understands the MetaWeblogAPI (though, I’ve only tested it on WP).

So, if you want to twitter on your own blog…download QSPress.

The posts look something like this and hey, no character limits. 😉

More on the QSPress page

LATER:
Eric, I say this script is proof XML-RPC isn’t dead.

Last time I checked, Flickr’s ‘blog this’ was XML-RPC. Copy-and-Paste and XML-RPC are two different things. C-and-P exists because video needs at least one ’embed’ tag and well, that’s hard. Add to that, XML-RPC needs an end-point url and a password, that’s a level of complexity above – ‘here take this code’. They serve two different functions – though the final product looks similar.

Posted on

Backing Up with rsync, iCal, and Applescript

This morning marks the completion of the first full backup I’ve done in quite a while. But not the last. For the past 3 months, I’ve been working on an automated backup system – so I no longer need to wonder if things are backed up. They are. In at least two places.

A little background:

  • I only have Macs in my house. One of them…the Mini, acts as a server
  • I’ve got a StrongSpace account. Not that this makes much of a difference, any accessible volume could work the same (I’m intrigued how S3 might work into the mix as well).

The backup system is tiered;

  1. Every couple of days, the “client” Macs, the ones that get used everyday, backup to the Mini with
    rsync -aE --exclude='.*' /usr/bin/ssh /[path to source folder (see below)]/ [username]@[url of local server]:/[path to your backup directory]/

    I’ve got these all wrapped up in a single backup.sh file, with a line for:

    ~/Library/Application\ Support
    ~/Library/Mail
    ~/Library/Keychains
    ~/Library/Documents/Projects
    ~/Library/Documents/Palm
    ~/Pictures
    ~/Desktop

  2. Then, the Mini backs up the client folders to StrongSpace.
    rsync -rltvz --exclude='.*' /usr/bin/ssh /[path to client backup folder]/ [username]@[url of online server]:/[path to your online backup directory]/
  3. I’m using SSH Keys (the /usr/bin/ssh in the strings above) to automate the login (see MagpieBrain for instructions on setting this up).
  4. On all the machines, the backup.sh file is wrapped in an Applescript
    do shell script "/Users/garrickvanburen/Documents/Projects/RSYNC/garrick_backup.sh"
  5. The Applescript is called from an alarm in iCal, like this

What’s your backup strategy?

ELSEWHERE:
David Roessli takes a different approach.